FANDOM


Social Status of Rural and Urban Working Women in Pakistan

von Prof. Dr. Amber Ferdoos

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[1.] Af/Fragment 027 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-03-13 13:27:52 Schumann
Af, Fragment, Gesichtet, KomplettPlagiat, Müller 2004, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Graf Isolan
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 27, Zeilen: 1-19
Quelle: Müller 2004
Seite(n): 1 (Internetversion), Zeilen: -
Furthermore, given the various interpretations of Islam in the individual Muslim countries and communities - whether traditional or modern, liberal or conservative - it is misleading to assume a priori that the teachings of Islam and equality for women are incompatible. There are interpretations that are in tune with women’s rights. Upon receiving the Nobel Peace Prize (2003), Shirin Ebadi emphasized:
"The discriminatory plight of women in Islamic States has its roots in the patriarchal and male-dominated culture prevailing in these societies, not in Islam".

Many Islamic states have signed the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). Nevertheless, almost all Arab Islamic states have attached fundamental reservations to their signatures: the provisions of the CEDAW must not run contrary to Sharia norms (Islamic law). It is particularly interesting to note here that some Muslim women are using the scope for interpretation they see in the Sharia to reduce legal and real discrimination against women. Practicing Muslim women are thus embracing the universal issue of women’s rights as their own cause, something unique that is inextricably linked to their culture and religion. Now that this issue has been absorbed as one of their own, women’s rights, feminism and social status can no longer be defamed as something imposed from the outside, rather these issues are gradually taking hold in Islamic identities and in fact are even based on religious norms.

Given the various interpretations of Islam in the individual Muslim countries and communities - whether traditional or modern, liberal or conservative - it is misleading to assume a priori that the teachings of Islam and equality for women are incompatible. There are interpretations that are in tune with women's rights. Upon receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Shirin Ebadi emphasized, "The discriminatory plight of women in Islamic States (...) has its roots in the patriarchal and male-dominated culture prevailing in these societies, not in Islam".

[...]

Many Islamic states have signed the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). Nevertheless, almost all Arab Islamic states have attached fundamental reservations to their signatures: the provisions of the CEDAW must not run contrary to Sharia norms, that is to Islamic law. [...]

[...]

What I find particularly interesting here are the efforts by some Muslim women to use the scope for interpretation they see in the Sharia to reduce legal and real discrimination against women. Practising Muslim women are thus embracing the universal issue of women's rights as their own cause, something unique that is inextricably linked to their culture and religion.

Now that this issue has been absorbed as one of their own, women's rights, feminism and equality can no longer be defamed as something imposed from the outside, by the West, rather these issues are gradually taking hold in Islamic identities and in fact are even based on religious norms. I think we ought to discuss such creative approaches in more detail.

Anmerkungen

Nothing but the obvious quote has been marked as a citation.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), SleepyHollow02

[2.] Af/Fragment 027 33 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-03-12 18:15:32 Graf Isolan
Af, Fragment, Gesichtet, KomplettPlagiat, Müller 2004, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Graf Isolan
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 27, Zeilen: 33-35
Quelle: Müller 2004
Seite(n): 1 (Internetversion), Zeilen: -
2.3.1 Women’s status in Islamic World-a short note

According to a UN Report, the lack of involvement of women in political and economic life constitutes an essential impediment to the development of Arab states. The Arab Human Development Report first published in 2002 criticizes the fact that women are [discriminated against both as far as political participation is concerned and in the workplace.]

According to a UN Report, the lack of involvement of women in political and economic life constitutes an essential impediment to the development of Arab states. The Arab Human Development Report first published in 2002 criticizes the fact that women are discriminated against both as far as political participation is concerned and in the workplace.
Anmerkungen

Nothing has been marked as a citation.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), SleepyHollow02


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