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European Integration and the Western Balkans

von Prof. Dr. Avni Mazrreku

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[1.] Ama/Fragment 013 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-08-16 15:04:41 PlagProf:-)
Ama, Chalmers et al 2006, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Verschleierung

Typus
Verschleierung
Bearbeiter
Hindemith
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 13, Zeilen: 1-19
Quelle: Chalmers et al 2006
Seite(n): 4, 5, 6, Zeilen: 4: 23 ff.; 5: 5 ff.; 6: 12 ff.
[The establishment of the modern nation-state consolidated power in centralized,] impersonal bureaucracies and led to certain core policies — such as tax, law and order and foreign policy — being exclusive competencies of these bureaucracies.46 This hegemony of the nation-state over political life led to Europe acquiring new associations in the eighteen [sic] and nineteen [sic] centuries.

Authors such as Rousseau and Kant saw Europe as an expression of certain ideals: be it social contract between nations, in the case of Rousseau, or as a form of perpetual peace, according to Kant. The unification of different regions within the nation-state led to its being perceived increasingly as a unitary political community. No such development occurred with regard to the idea of Europe. When independent proposals for a 'United Europe' emerged at the end of seventeen [sic] century,47 they were still firmly confederal in nature. A more far-reaching proposal was put forward by John Bellers in 1710. Bellers proposed a cantonal system based upon Swiss model. The first proposal suggesting a Europe in which the state system, within which there was a sovereign central body, came from a Frenchman, Saint-Simon, in a pamphlet published in 1814, entitled Plan for Reorganization of European Society.

The role of the USA in two World Wars, the Cold War, and in the regeneration of Europe after the Second World War have heavily influenced European Identity.48


46 C. Tilli [sic], The Formation of Nation-State [sic] in Europe [sic], Princeton, NJ 1975; G. Poggi, The Development of the Modern State: A Sociological Introduction, Stanford, CA 1978; M. Mann, The Autonomous Power of the State: Its Origins, Merchants [sic] and Results, 1984 European Journal of Sociology 185; H. Spryet [sic], The Sovereign State and its Competitors: an Analysis of System [sic] Change, Princeton, NJ 1994.

47 Penn, William, An Essay towards the Present and Future of Peace of Europe, London 1693.

48 G. Delanty, Inventing Europe: Idea, Identity, Reality, Basingstoke 1995, pp. 115-155.

The establishment of the modern nation-state consolidated power in centralised, impersonal bureaucracies and led to certain core policies, such as tax, law and order and foreign policy, being the exclusive competence of these bureaucracies.4 This hegemony of the nation-state over political life led to Europe acquiring new associations in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. [...] Authors such as Rousseau and Kant saw Europe as an expression of certain ideals: be it a social contract between nations, in the case of Rousseau, or as a form of perpetual peace, according to Kant.

[page 5]

The role of the USA in two World Wars, the Cold War, and in the regeneration of Europe after the Second World War, heavily influenced European identity.6

[page 6]

The unification of different regions within the nation-state led to its being perceived increasingly as a unitary political community. No such development occurred with regard to the idea of Europe. When independent proposals for a ‘united Europe' emerged at the end of the seventeenth century, they were still firmly confederal in nature. [...] A more far-reaching proposal was put forward by John Bellers in 1710. Bellers proposed a cantonal system based upon the Swiss model whereby Europe would be divided into 100 cantons, each of which would be required to contribute to a European army and send representatives to a European Senate.

The first proposal suggesting a Europe in which the state system was to be replaced by a system within which there was a sovereign central body, came from the Frenchman, Saint-Simon. In a pamphlet published in 1814, entitled Plan for the Reorganisation of the European Society, Saint-Simon took a romanticised view of the Middle Ages, which he considered to have been disrupted by the religious wars.


4 C. Tilly (ed.), The Formation of Nation-States [sic] in Europe [sic] (Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1975); G. Poggi, The Development of the Modern State: A Sociological Introduction (Stanford, CA, Stanford University Press, 1978); M. Mann, ‘The Autonomous Power of the State: its Origins, Mechanisms and Results’ (1984) 25 European Journal of Sociology 185; H. Spruyt, The Sovereign State and its Competitors: an Analysis of Systems Change (Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1994).

6 G. Delanty, Inventing Europe: Idea, Identity, Reality (Basingstoke, Macmillan, 1995) 115-55.

Anmerkungen

The source is not mentioned. Ama copies mistakes from the source: the correct title of the volume edited by Charles Tilly is "Formation of national States in Western Europe". Ama adds additional mistakes.

Sichter
(Hindemith), SleepyHollow02, PlagProf:-)


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