FANDOM


European Integration and the Western Balkans

von Prof. Dr. Avni Mazrreku

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[1.] Ama/Fragment 111 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-07-13 17:20:01 Klgn
Ama, BauernOpfer, Bowman 2002, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

Typus
BauernOpfer
Bearbeiter
Hindemith
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 111, Zeilen: 1-32
Quelle: Bowman 2002
Seite(n): 1, 2, Zeilen: 1: 16 ff.; 2: 1 ff.
[While steadfastly refusing to contribute ground forces to the UN Protection Force (UNPROFOR) in Bosnia,] the Clinton administration, beginning in February, maintained a commitment to provide them to oversee implementation of an overall peace settlement. With the 1994 peace negotiated at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton OH, administration officials began to lay out their rationale and initial planning for U.S. participation in a NATO-led peace implementation force (IFOR) for Bosnia. Administration officials argued the U.S participation with ground forces was necessary for two main reasons: 377

— The Bosnian, Croatian and Serbs [sic] negotiators all made U.S ground force participation a condition of their accepting any peace settlement; and

— U.S participation was necessary for the United States to maintain a leadership position in NATO. President Clinton subsequently emphasized a moral responsibility to avoid [sic!] ending the savagery of the Bosnian war.

On 14 December 1995, the Presidents of Bosnia, Croatia, and Serbia signed a peace agreement in Paris. In brief, the military elements of the agreement, in addition to establishing IFOR and granting it full authority and freedom of movement to enforce the agreement, called for:

— withdrawal of forces behind cease-fire lines 30 days with a demilitarised zone (DMZ) of four kilometres;

— withdrawal of heavy weapons and personnel to barracks;

— provisions of information on personnel, weaponry, and landmines;

— arms reductions under the auspices of the Organization for Cooperation and Security in Europe (OSCE).

All these objectives have been completed, with the exception of the arms reduction process which the OSCE continues to oversee.

To enforce the military provisions of the Dayton agreements, NATO sent the Intervention Force (IFOR) which comprised approximately 54,000 ground troops in Bosnia proper. That force lasted until 20 December 1996, when it was changed to the Stabilization Force (SFOR). This reflected the division amongst NATO's members that the Bosnia deployment should not have a specified end-date, but rather that its duration would be tied to successful accomplishment of Dayton Peace Accord provisions. Though SFOR, the operation has UN Security Council authorization.


377 CRS Issues, Brief for Congress, Bosnia: U.S. Military Operations, updated 8 July 2003, Order Code IB93056.

While steadfastly refusing to contribute ground forces to UN Protection Force (UNPROFOR) in Bosnia, the Clinton Administration, beginning in February 1993, maintained a commitment to provide them to oversee implementation of an overall peace settlement. With the 1994 peace negotiations at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton OH, Administration officials began to lay out their rationale and initial planning for U.S. participation in a NATO-led peace implementation force (IFOR) for Bosnia. Administration officials argued that U.S. participation with ground forces was necessary for two main reasons: 1) the Bosnian, Croatian, and Serb negotiators all made U.S. ground force participation a condition of their accepting any peace settlement; and 2) U.S. participation was necessary for the United States to maintain a leadership position in NATO. President Clinton subsequently emphasized a moral responsibility to aid in ending the savagery of the Bosnian conflict.

On December 14, 1995, the Presidents of Croatia, Bosnia, and Serbia signed a peace agreement in Paris. In brief, the military elements of the agreement, in addition to establishing IFOR and granting it full authority and freedom of movement to enforce the agreement, calls for: 1) withdrawal of forces behind cease-fire lines within 30 days, with a demilitarized zone (DMZ) of four kilometers; 2) withdrawal of heavy weapons and personnel to barracks; 3) provision of information on personnel, weaponry, and landmines; 4) arms reduction negotiations under the auspices of the Organization for Cooperation and Security in Europe (OSCE). All these objectives have been completed, with the exception of the arms reduction process which the OSCE continues to oversee.

To enforce the military provisions of the Dayton agreements, NATO sent the Intervention Force or (IFOR), which comprised approximately 54,000 ground troops in

[page 2]

Bosnia proper. That force designation and lasted until December 20, 1996, when it was changed to Stabilization Force (SFOR). This reflected the decision by NATO’s members that the Bosnia deployment should not have a specified end-date, but rather that its duration would be tied to successful accomplishment of Dayton Peace Accord provisions. Though the SFOR operations have U.N. Security Council authorization, there is no “dual-key” command relationship with the United Nations.

Anmerkungen

The source is mentioned, but the extent of copied text does not become clear to the reader. Nothing is marked as a citation.

Sichter
(Hindemith), SleepyHollow02, WiseWoman


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