FANDOM


European Integration and the Western Balkans

von Prof. Dr. Avni Mazrreku

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[1.] Ama/Fragment 117 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-06-14 12:31:44 WiseWoman
Ama, Bechev 2004, Fragment, Gesichtet, KomplettPlagiat, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Graf Isolan
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 117, Zeilen: 1-12, 101-103
Quelle: Bechev 2004
Seite(n): 5, Zeilen: 5-13, 101-102
Part G First Steps for the Hope and Future of the Western-Balkans

I. Cologne Council

The violence in Kosovo leading to the NATO campaign against Yugoslavia introduced important qualitative changes in the EU's policy towards South East Europe. If the US and NATO had done a great job of defeating Milosevic militarily, the 'Europeans' had to pay the bill and generate economic growth and political stability in the region. The Stability Pact launched by the German Presidency of the EU resurrected the idea of the 'hour of Europe', and this time the dawn was for real.394 It was clear that it was the EU's job to assemble and coordinate a coalition of international donors. Yet, to be credible, the EU had to make certain promises to South East Europe.


394 See Lykke Friis and Anna Murphy, Turbo-charged Negotiations: the EU and the Stability Pact for South Eastern Europe, Journal of European Public Policy, Vol. 7, No. 5, 2000, pp. 767-786.

How Much is Enough?: the EU involvement after the Kosovo war

The violence in Kosovo leading to the NATO campaign against Yugoslavia introduced important qualitative changes in the EU’s policy towards South East Europe. If the US and NATO had done the dirty work of defeating Milosevic militarily, the ‘Europeans’ had to pay the bill and generate economic growth and political stability in the region. The Stability Pact launched by the German Presidency of the EU resurrected the idea of the ‘hour of Europe’, and this time the dawn was for real.1 It was clear that it was the EU’s job to assemble and coordinate a coalition of international donors. Yet, to be credible, the EU had to make certain promises to South East Europe.


1 See Lykke Friis and Anna Murphy, ‘”Turbo-charged Negotiations”: the EU and the Stability Pact for South Eastern Europe,’ Journal of European Public Policy vol. 7, no. 5, 2000, pp. 767-86

Anmerkungen

No source mentioned; nothing has been marked as a citation.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), WiseWoman

[2.] Ama/Fragment 117 21 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-06-14 12:40:11 WiseWoman
Ama, Bechev 2004, Fragment, Gesichtet, KomplettPlagiat, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop

Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Graf Isolan
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 117, Zeilen: 21-34, 106
Quelle: Bechev 2004
Seite(n): 5, 6, Zeilen: 5:15-24, 103; 6:1-3
The Pact's founding documents solemnly declared that "the EU will draw the region closer to the perspective of full integration of these countries in South East Europe into its structures".396 However, it was very much unclear how the Stability Pact squared with integration. It remained, by and large, post-conflict reconstruction strategy funded by the International Financial Institutions, the EU and its Member States. In terms of its approach, the Pact was not an accession platform. Initiated by the German Presidency and sanctioned by the Cologne Council, it was nonetheless placed institutionally under the OSCE. The EU was just one, albeit the most important, stakeholder amongst many. The Pact exemplified a trend: the EU took over the economy pillar within the Kosovo's UN administration (UNMIK), but preferred sharing responsibility with a vast range of international actors. The Stability Pact, however, contained only part of the story. Parallel to it, the EU launched the Stabilization and Association Process (SAP) as a new instrument to upgrade its contractual relations with the Western [Balkan states.]

396 Stability Pact for South East Europe, Cologne, 10 June 1999.

The Pact’s founding documents solemnly declared that ‘The EU will draw the region closer to the perspective of full integration of these countries [in South East Europe] into its structures.’2 However, it was very much unclear how the Stability Pact squared with integration. It remained, by and large, post-conflict reconstruction strategy funded by the International Financial Institutions, the EU and its Member States. In terms of its approach, the Pact was not an accession platform. Initiated by the German Presidency and sanctioned by the Cologne Council, it was nonetheless placed institutionally under the OSCE. The EU was just one, albeit the most important, stakeholder amongst many. The Pact exemplified a trend: the EU took over the economy pillar within the Kosovo’s UN administration (UNMIK), but preferred sharing responsibility with a vast range of international actors.

[page 6]

The Stability Pact, however, contained only part of the story. Parallel to it, the EU launched the Stabilisation and Association Process (SAP) as a new instrument to upgrade its contractual relations with the Western Balkan states.


2 Stability Pact for South East Europe, Cologne, 10 June 1999, p. 20.

Anmerkungen

No source mentioned; nothing has been marked as a citation.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), WiseWoman


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