FANDOM


European Integration and the Western Balkans

von Prof. Dr. Avni Mazrreku

vorherige Seite | zur Übersichtsseite | folgende Seite
Statistik und Sichtungsnachweis dieser Seite findet sich am Artikelende
[1.] Ama/Fragment 135 01 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2017-11-09 21:47:03 Schumann
Ama, Calin 2003, Fragment, Gesichtet, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Verschleierung

Typus
Verschleierung
Bearbeiter
SleepyHollow02
Gesichtet
Yes
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 135, Zeilen: 1 ff. (entire page)
Quelle: Calin 2003
Seite(n): 8, 9, 14, 18, Zeilen: 8: last lines; 9: 13 ff.; 14: 1 ff.; 18: 2 ff.
Nowadays, stability should be understood as a kind process of social and political evolution with contradictory elements, both cooperative and confrontational, open-ended as to its results and with the goal of strengthening and making more durable the cooperative elements. Stability can only be achieved as the result of the mutual relationship between the creation of internal structures and internal developments; the latter being of a decisive importance.434

Unfortunately, at the dusk of the post-Cold War era, the Western democracies proved not be ready to cope with the challenges of the new security environment. The immediate consequence of this unpreparedness of the West was the emergence of sub-regional conflicts, especially in the geographical area of the Balkan. The stances adopted by the West as a whole were quite ambiguous ones and they were almost useless (at least in the outset of the crisis) due to the lack of coordination (and sometimes a sort strange competition) between various international organizations and bodies such as UN, NATO and EU.

The end of the Cold War period and emergence of the new risks and threats challenging security led to the widening of the concept. Consequently, one could talk about a multidimensional security concept covering various sectors: military security, political security, economic security, societal security, and environmental security.

The evolution of strategy in Europe now requires a redefinition of the role of international organizations and institutions, including their involvement in conflict prevention and regional crisis management. A comprehensive approach to security and stability encompassing their entire aspects — political, military, economic, social, environmental etc. — has to be developed. This approach should lead to an integrated Europe with dividing lines; the enlargement processes of the EU and the NATO are decisive factors in this respect. As far as the Western Balkans countries are concerned, the last decade has witnessed the continuing transition from authoritarian governments and centrally planned economies to pluralist democracies and free markets. At the moment, all countries in the region have democratically elected governments. The further success of the democratic and free market reforms is crucial for the future.

Although significant progress towards peace and stability has been made, challenges still exist and no single state or international organization can deal with these challenges by itself. A concentrated effort towards security and stability is needed. Consequently, regional and international cooperation and also the ongoing integration process are indispensable to address challenges.


434 Cf. Nerlich, U., Possibilities and Problems of Constellation Analysis as the Basis of Future Security Planning, in: Heydrich, W., Kraus, J., Nerlich, U., Notzold, J., Rumel, R., Germany's Security Policy: New Risks, Instruments, Baden-Baden 1992, pp. 23-75.

Nowadays stability should be understood as a kind of process, i.e. a social and political evolution with contradictory elements, both cooperative and confrontational, open-ended as to its results and with the goal of strengthening and making more durable the cooperative elements. Stability can only be achieved as the result of the mutual relationship between the creation of internal structures and internal developments7, the latter being of decisive importance.

[page 9]

Unfortunately, at the dawn of the new post-Cold War era, the Western democracies proved not to be ready to cope with the challenges of the new security environment. And the immediate consequence of this unpreparedness of the West was the emergence of sub-regional conflicts, especially in the geographical space of the Socialist Federative Republic of Yugoslavia (by that time).

The stances adopted by the West as whole were quite ambiguous ones and they were almost useless (at least in the outset of the crisis) due to the lack of coordination (and sometimes a sort strange competition) between various international organizations and bodies, e.g. UN, NATO and the EU8.

[page 14]

The end of the Cold War period and the emergence of new risks and threats challenging security led to the widening of the concept. Consequently, one could talk about a multidimensional security concept covering various sectors: military security, political security, economic security, societal security, and environmental security.

[page 18]

Regional security challenges and opportunities34

The evolution of the strategic environment in Europe requires a redefinition of the role of international organizations and institutions, including through involvement in conflict prevention and regional crisis management. A comprehensive approach to security and stability encompassing all their aspects – political, military, economic, social, environmental etc. – has to be developed. This approach should lead to an integrated Europe without dividing lines and the enlargement processes of the EU and NATO are decisive factors in this respect. As far as the SEE is concerned, the last decade it has witnessed the continuing transition from authoritarian governments and centrally planned economies to pluralist democracies and free markets. At the moment, all countries in this region have democratically elected governments. The success of the democratic and free market reforms is crucial for the future.

Although significant progress towards peace and stability has been made, challenges still exist and no single state or international organization can deal with these challenges by itself. A concerted effort towards security and stability is needed. Consequently, regional and international cooperation and also the ongoing integration processes are indispensable to address challenges.


7 Cf. Nerlich, U., Posibilities and Problems of a Constellation Analysis as the Basis of Future Security Planning, in: Heydrich, W., Krause, J., Nerlich, U., Notzold, J., Rummel, R. (eds.), Germany’s Security Policy: New Constellations, risks, Instruments, Baden-Baden 1992, pp.23-75.

8 [...]

34 This sub-section relies on the South East Europe Common Assessment Paper on Regional Security Challenges and Opportunities (SEECAP), endorsed on 29 May 2001 by the states of the EAPC at the EAPC Foreign Ministers Meeting in Budapest.

Anmerkungen

The source is not given. Note that this passage can be found in the chapter: "Conclusions and Perspectives."

Footnote 8 of the source contains a long explanation, not documented here.

Sichter
(SleepyHollow02), WiseWoman


vorherige Seite | zur Übersichtsseite | folgende Seite
Letzte Bearbeitung dieser Seite: durch Benutzer:WiseWoman, Zeitstempel: 20170730220500

Störung durch Adblocker erkannt!


Wikia ist eine gebührenfreie Seite, die sich durch Werbung finanziert. Benutzer, die Adblocker einsetzen, haben eine modifizierte Ansicht der Seite.

Wikia ist nicht verfügbar, wenn du weitere Modifikationen in dem Adblocker-Programm gemacht hast. Wenn du sie entfernst, dann wird die Seite ohne Probleme geladen.