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Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Hindemith
Gesichtet
Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 77, Zeilen: 18-42
Quelle: Steurer et al 2008
Seite(n): 12, 13, Zeilen: 12: last paragraph; 13: 1ff
CSR policies in Europe, the role of governments and the EU-Member State interface

Why should governments care about CSR? While several actors oppose the view that governments should take action with regard to CSR by emphasising that the concept is widely regarded as a voluntary business or management approach, there are good reasons suggesting that governments should not leave the field entirely to businesses and civil society actors. Among these reasons are, for example, the following:

Since CSR is concerned with managing business relations with a broad variety of stakeholders, the concept obviously reshapes not only management routines, but also the roles and relations of all three societal domains, i.e. businesses, governments and civil society. Consequently, CSR is not only a management approach that can be left to the discretion of managers, but it is also a highly political concept that entails societal conflicts as well as a considerable scope for new government activities.

The widely shared view that CSR is voluntary does not contradict the fact that respective activities are often a response to stakeholder pressure; it emphasises that CSR practices are not required by law but go beyond legal standards. Thus, governments inevitably define CSR negatively with regulations, and they want to define it also positively with softer, non-binding policy instruments.

These CSR policies coincide with a broader transition of public governance altogether, away from command and control towards more network-like and partnering arrangements. In this respect, CSR policies can be seen as a key component of a broader transition to new governance forms that is observed in several policy fields.

In addition, governments care about CSR because respective business activities can help to meet public policy goals of sustainable development without making use of often un-popular (or even politically infeasible) regulations.

Topic 2 CSR policies, the role of governments and the EU-Member State interface

Why should governments care about CSR? While several actors oppose the view that governments should take action with regard to CSR by emphasising that the concept is widely regarded as a voluntary business or management approach, there are good reasons suggesting that governments should not leave the field entirely to businesses and civil society actors. Among these reasons are, for example, the following:

[page 13]

Since CSR is concerned with managing business relations with a broad variety of stakeholders, the concept obviously reshapes not only management routines, but also the roles and relations of all three societal domains, i.e. businesses, governments and civil society. Consequently, CSR is not only a management approach that can be left to the discretion of managers, but it is also a highly political concept that entails societal conflicts as well as a considerable scope for new government activities.

The widely shared view that CSR is voluntary does not contradict the fact that respective activities are often a response to stakeholder pressure; it emphasises that CSR practices are not required by law but go beyond legal standards. Thus, governments inevitably define CSR negatively with regulations, and they want to define it also positively with softer, non-binding policy instruments.

These CSR policies coincide with a broader transition of public governance altogether, away from command and control towards more network-like and partnering arrangements. In this respect, CSR policies can be seen as a key component of a broader transition to new governance forms that is observed in several policy fields.

In addition, governments care about CSR because respective business activities can help to meet public policy goals of sustainable development without making use of often un-popular (or even politically infeasible) regulations.

Anmerkungen

The source is not mentioned.

Sichter
(Hindemith), PlagProf:-)

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