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Typus
KomplettPlagiat
Bearbeiter
Hindemith
Gesichtet
Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 79, Zeilen: 1ff (entire page)
Quelle: Steurer et al 2008
Seite(n): 14, 15, Zeilen: 14: 18ff; 15: 1ff
[A third option is to start out with an] SCP action plan or framework, and to merge it with the SD strategy later on. The third option is, for example, recommended by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). As the figure below illustrates, it depicts SCP policy making as a cycle that moves from a national inventory catalogue of ongoing SCP activities via an SCP action plan to the full integration of SCP in a major national strategy process, such as an Environmental Action Plan or a SD strategy (UNEP, 2008). This step-wise approach was taken, for instance, in the Czech Republic, Finland, and the UK.

Figure 12: SCP policy making as a cycle (author’s illustration, embedded image)

Msc 079a diss.png

If we explore the extent to which the SD strategies of 19 EU Member States refer to SCP in their objectives, the following picture emerges. 18 of the 19 SD strategies refer to SCP in their objectives. Among them, 6 mention SCP between 1-3 times, 8 between 4-6 times and 4 more than 7 times. Member States that have integrated SCP from the outset into their NSDS are, for example, Austria and France.

A similarity in the context of CSR is that EU Member States organise and coordinate CSR policies in very different ways. Apart from this, however, we find a different picture than in the context of SCP. While in most countries several actors pursue a variety of initiatives in a decentralized way, some (mostly leading) countries approach CSR policies in a more coordinated way. The United Kingdom, for example, has appointed a Minister for CSR, and the Netherlands and Sweden have established CSR platforms that bundle several government activities. SD strategies, however, pay hardly any attention to CSR. Another look into the same database on SD strategy objectives revealed that 8 out of 19 SD strategies from across Europe do not contain a single objective on CSR, and most of the remaining 11 SD strategies contain only one vague reference to promoting CSR‖ [sic] with unspecified means. Although SD and CSR both aim to better integrate economic, social and environmental issues, joint efforts obviously still face sectoral and institutional barriers. While the SD agenda is often dominated by environmental issues and ministries, expertise on CSR policies is mainly affiliated with Ministries of Labour and Social Security. It can be concluded that, ― [sic] the close conceptual link between SD and CSR given, ignoring CSR policies in SD strategies is a missed chance of bridging the obvious gap between the two closely related policy fields.

A third option is to start out with an SCP action plan or framework, and to merge it with the SD strategy later on.

The third option is, for example, recommended by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). As figure 4 illustrates, it depicts SCP policy making as a cycle that moves from a national inventory catalogue of ongoing SCP activities via an SCP action plan to the full integration of SCP in a major national strategy process, such as an Environmental Action Plan or a SD strategy (UNEP, 2008). This step-wise approach was taken, for instance, in the Czech Republic, Finland, and the UK (ETC/RWM, 2007).

Msc 079a source.png

Figure 4: National SCP Programme Cycle (Source: UNEP, 2008)

[page 15]

If we explore the extent to which the SD strategies of 19 EU Member States refer to SCP in their objectives, the following picture emerges (for methodological details of the underlying study, click here). 18 of the 19 SD strategies refer to SCP in their objectives. Among them, 6 mention SCP between 1-3 times, 8 between 4-6 times and 4 more than 7 times. Member States that have integrated SCP from the outset into their NSDS are, for example, Austria and France (ETC/RWM, 2007).

A similarity in the context of CSR is that EU Member States organise and coordinate CSR policies in very different ways. Apart from this, however, we find a different picture than in the context of SCP. While in most countries several actors pursue a variety of initiatives in a decentralized way, some (mostly leading) countries approach CSR policies in a more coordinated way. The UK, for example, has appointed a Minister for CSR, and the Netherlands and Sweden have established CSR platforms that bundle several government activities. SD strategies, however, pay hardly any attention to CSR. Another look into the same database on SD strategy objectives revealed that 8 out of 19 SD strategies from across Europe do not contain a single objective on CSR, and most of the remaining 11 SD strategies contain only one vague reference to "promoting CSR" with unspecified means (for methodological details of the underlying study, click here). Although SD and CSR both aim to better integrate economic, social and environmental issues, joint efforts obviously still face sectoral and institutional barriers. While the SD agenda is often dominated by environmental issues and ministries, expertise on CSR policies is mainly affiliated with Ministries of Labour and Social Security. In the ESDN Quarterly Report June 2008 we conclude that, "the close conceptual link between SD and CSR given, ignoring CSR policies in SD strategies is a missed chance of bridging the obvious gap between the two closely related policy fields".

Anmerkungen

The source is not mentioned.

Note that the author claims to have created the graphical illustration in figure 12, which in the original was attributed to "UNEP, 2008".

Note that the signs "‖" and "―" in the dissertation are created by copying and pasting quotation marks in the source.

Sichter
(Hindemith), PlagProf:-)

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