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Angaben zur Quelle [Bearbeiten]

Autor     Bulend Shanay
Titel    Islam: Sunni Tradition: Malikiyyah
Sammlung    Overview of World Religions
Herausgeber    Museum of World Religions, Taiwan, and the Department of Religion and Social Ethics, St.Martins's College, Lancaster
Jahr    2001
URL    http://web.archive.org/web/20010123104100/http://www.philtar.ucsm.ac.uk/encyclopedia/islam/sunni/malik.html

Literaturverz.   

nein
Fußnoten    nein
Fragmente    2


Fragmente der Quelle:
[1.] Maa/Fragment 084 14 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2013-09-16 10:40:32 Graf Isolan
Fragment, Gesichtet, Maa, OWR Malikiyyah 2001, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Verschleierung

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Graf Isolan
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Yes.png
Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 84, Zeilen: 14-25
Quelle: OWR Malikiyyah 2001
Seite(n): 1 (Internetquelle), Zeilen: -
Such was his stature that it is said three 'Abbasid caliphs visited him while they were on Pilgrimage to Medina.

As a result of the circumstances Malik bin Anas has been confronted with, the Malikis' concept of ijma' differed from the one of the Hanafis in that they understood it to mean the consensus of the community represented by the people of Medina Prophet City. Imam Malik's major contribution to Islamic law is his book al-Muwatta (The Beaten Path). The Muwatta is a code of law based on the legal practices that were operating in Medina. It covers various areas ranging from prescribed rituals of prayer and fasting to the correct conduct of business relations. The legal code is supported by some 2000 traditions attributed to the Prophet.

The Malikis' concept of ijma' differed from that of the Hanafis in that they understood it to mean the consensus of the community represented by the people of Medina. [...]

Imam Malik's major contribution to Islamic law is his book al-Muwatta (The Beaten Path). The Muwatta is a code of law based on the legal practices that were operating in Medina. It covers various areas ranging from prescribed rituals of prayer and fasting to the correct conduct of business relations. The legal code is supported by some 2,000 traditions attributed to the Prophet.

[...] Such was his stature that it is said three 'Abbasid caliphs visited him while they were on Pilgrimage to Medina.

Anmerkungen

Kein Hinweis auf eine Übernahme.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), SleepyHollow02

[2.] Maa/Fragment 085 10 - Diskussion
Zuletzt bearbeitet: 2013-09-16 10:42:23 Graf Isolan
Fragment, Gesichtet, Maa, OWR Malikiyyah 2001, SMWFragment, Schutzlevel sysop, Verschleierung

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Untersuchte Arbeit:
Seite: 85, Zeilen: 10-23
Quelle: OWR Malikiyyah 2001
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The School that was founded spread westwards through Malik's disciples and become very influential if not dominant in North Africa and Spain. The second 'Abbasid caliph, al-Mansur (died in 775), even approached the Medinan jurist with the proposal to establish a judicial system that would unite the different judicial methods that were operating at that time throughout the Islamic world.

Despite those tendencies, it lost some of its appeal. Much later, in the Ottoman period, the Maliki School had to cede most of its influence to the Hanafite School because under the Ottomans judicial relevance was especially granted to the latter. North Africa, however, remained faithful to its Malikite heritage. Such was the strength of the local tradition that kadis (judges) from both the Hanafite and Malikite traditions cooperated with the local ruler. Following the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Malikiyyah regained its position of ascendancy in the region. Today Malikite doctrine and practice remains widespread throughout North Africa, the Sudan and regions of West and Central Africa.

The second 'Abbasid caliph, al-Mansur (d.775), approached the Medinan jurist with the proposal to establish a judicial system that would unite the different judicial methods that were operating at that time throughout the Islamic world.

The school spread westwards through Malik's disciples, becoming dominant in North Africa and Spain. In North Africa Malikiyyah gave rise to an important Sufi order, Shadhiliyyah, which was founded by Abu al-Hasan, a jurist in the Malikite school, in Tunisia in the thirteenth century.

During the Ottoman period Hanafite Turks were given the most important judicial in the Ottoman empire. North Africa, however, remained faithful to its Malikite heritage. Such was the strength of the local tradition that qadis (judges) from both the Hanafite and Malikite traditions worked with the local ruler. Following the fall of the Ottoman empire, Malikiyyah regained its position of ascendancy in the region. Today Malikite doctrine and practice remains widespread throughout North Africa, the Sudan and regions of West and Central Africa.

Anmerkungen

Kein Hinweis auf eine Übernahme.

Sichter
(Graf Isolan), SleepyHollow02

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